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Free Legal Resources Fair at the Saskatoon Public Library

By Alan Kilpatrick 

The Saskatoon Public Library’s Frances Morrison branch hosted a free Legal Resources Fair during Saskatchewan’s Third Access to Justice Week.  The fair featured a tradeshow, legal assistance clinics, and presentations on legal topics.

The fair’s bustling trade show included representatives from non-profit, government, and community organizations.  It gave members of the public a chance to connect with Saskatoon’s legal service providers.

Volunteer lawyers and law students from the Ministry of Justice, Pro Bono Law Saskatchewan, and Pro Bono Students Canada hosted a free walk-in family law information clinic.  Lawyers from CJC & Co. LLP volunteered to host a free walk-in wills and estates information clinic

Law Society Librarian’s Ken Fox and Alan Kilpatrick were proud to attend the trade show and to connect with members of the public who had questions about legal information.

Hosting a fair like this aligns naturally with the mission of public libraries.  CREATE Justice explains further on its website:

Saskatoon Public Library’s mission includes providing free and open access to resources as well as providing community spaces where people and ideas meet. Through the Legal Resource Fair, we are able to help meet the legal needs of Saskatoon citizens with the tradeshow of service providers, a walk-in family law information clinic, and a walk-in wills & estates information clinic.

The Law Society Library is looking forward to participating in the Regina Public Library’s annual Legal Resources Fair in Winter 2019.

Sources

Create Justice. (2018, October). Saskatchewan access to justice week. Retrieved from https://law.usask.ca/createjustice/saskatchewan-access-to-justice-week.php

Legal Sourcery. (2018, October 24). Free Legal Resources Fair – Saskatoon. Retrieved from https://lsslib.wordpress.com/2018/10/24/free-legal-resources-fair-saskatoon/

Primer on Saskatchewan’s Legalization of Cannabis

By Alan Kilpatrick

Do you need to get up speed on legal cannabis?  The Law Society Library’s team of information professionals have put together this brief primer for you.

You can find a variety of posts about Saskatchewan’s legalization of cannabis on Legal Sourcery, the Law Society of Saskatchewan Library blog:

• Towards Cannabis Legalization in Canada
• Cannabis Legislation in Saskatchewan – Effective When?
More Cannabis Legislation – Effective October 17

Law Society members can purchase this recorded CPD seminar that explores cannabis from insurance, criminal, labour, and law enforcement perspectives:

• Seminar: After the Ash Settles – The Legalisation of Recreational Marijuana (CPD-187)

Saskatchewan’s Public Legal Education Association (PLEA) has also produced this excellent document.  It provides a practical and straightforward overview of the province’s new cannabis regulatory scheme:

• Cannabis Regulation

PLEA, as you know, is a non-profit organization that creates plain language legal information for the public.  Those who want to learn more can also consult this helpful page created by the Government of Saskatchewan:

• Cannabis Use in Saskatchewan

Finally, researchers will be grateful to learn that Saskatchewan’s Legislative Library has created an in-depth bibliography of articles, scholarly sources, and resources that explore legal cannabis use:

• Cannabis: A Select Bibliography

Saskatchewan Library Week – Libraries Transform

By Alan Kilpatrick

Saskatchewan Library Week (SLW), an annual province-wide event, is being celebrated this year from October 14-20, 2018.  SLW celebrates Saskatchewan’s diverse and varied library sector and promotes the many services that libraries provide.  The Saskatchewan Library Association, an organization dedicated to library development, has hosted SLW since 1976.

Saskatchewan is home to over 1200 libraries.  This includes public, school, academic, health, law, and government libraries.  They provide a multitude of dynamic and competitive services to Saskatchewan’s citizens, students, and professionals.  SLW is an opportunity for Saskatchewan’s libraries to stand up and push back against ongoing threats to the library sector.

As a staunch member of Saskatchewan’s library community, the Law Society of Saskatchewan Library proudly celebrates SLW.  Learn more about the innovative service, expertise, and potential the Law Society Library provides at the following links:

• At the Leading Edge of Innovative Service: The Law Society of Saskatchewan Library
Law Society Library Technology Timeline
• Knowledge is Power: Jordan Furlong on Law Librarians and the Future Legal Market
• The Brass Tacks of Librarianship

Sources

• https://www.saskatchewan.ca/government/news-and-media/2018/october/16/library-week
 http://saskla.ca/programs/slw/slw-background

Creating CanLII Alerts

By Alan Kilpatrick

Did you know that you can receive instant notifications every time a new case is added to CanLII simply by subscribing to an RSS feed?  Would you like to monitor all new decisions from a particular level of court or administrative tribunal in Saskatchewan?  An RSS feed can do that for you.

RSS feeds deliver instant updates that inform you whenever a website is updated.  In CanLII’s case, they will alert you whenever a new decision is posted.

Our colleagues at the Law Society of Manitoba Library have put together an excellent guide that describes how to Create an Alert with CanLII.

We encourage you to check their guide out.

Source
Manitoba Law Library (2018). Create an alert with CanLII.  Retrieved from http://lawlibrary.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Create-an-Alert-with-CanLII.pdf.

Knowledge is Power: Jordan Furlong on Law Librarians and the Future Legal Market

By Alan Kilpatrick

Jordan Furlong is a well-known Canadian legal writer, innovator, and futurist.  Furlong spoke recently at the 2018 Canadian Association of Law Libraries Conference about the future of the legal market and the role law librarians will play in that market.

Key components of the future legal market include knowledge, data, and information.  Those who can harness knowledge and successfully acquire, analyze, and disseminate information to law firms will play an influential role in this new market.  Legal information professionals and law librarians, Furlong asserts, are the ideal group to do this given their robust and competitive set of skills and capabilities.

 The Future Legal Market

Today’s legal market is wrought by uncertainly and upheaval.  From deregulation to alternative service providers, little remains certain about the provision of legal services.  Furlong explains that the legal market of the future will be shaped by clients, markets, and law firms.

In the future, clients will expect faster results and more value for less money.  How clients identify value will be personal and subjective.  Lawyers will no longer dictate how client value is identified.  The market will transform as alternative service providers begin to provide routine legal services.  As clients take advantage of these cheaper alternatives, billable hours will diminish.  Legal technology and artificial intelligence will become increasingly innovative and capable.  Routine services will become automated and firm profitability will be further reduced.  Finally, law firm culture will experience a generational shift.  As millennials take over, firm culture will shift toward a strong focus on client satisfaction.

The Legal Intelligence Era

Client expectations, evolving markets, and firm transformations will dominate the legal market of the future.  Success with each of these elements will depend on gathering, understanding, and acting on relevant information, data, and knowledge.  Given the prominence of information, Furlong describes the future market as a legal intelligence era.  Law librarians, Furlong notes, will have a leading role to play with regards to client intelligence, firm intelligence, and market intelligence.

Legal information professionals can play a role in gathering critical intelligence about clients and making that intelligence easily accessible to the firm.  Client intelligence could include client profiles, matter summaries, and satisfaction surveys.  Taking advantage of legal information professionals will help save firm lawyers’ time, maintain firm profitability, achieve better client outcomes, and ensure higher client satisfaction.

Law librarians can produce internal intelligence about firm practices, processes, and procedures.  Furlong explains that firms often know little about themselves and how they operate internally.  Firm intelligence could include profitability reports and process improvement recommendations.  This type of in-house intelligence is critical as it will help make existing firm processes more cost efficient and sustainable.

Finally, market intelligence will be crucial.  With expert business research skills, information professionals are uniquely positioned to produce competitor reports, scouting reports, and trend overviews for the firm.  Accurate market intelligence like this will enable a firm to gain advantages over its competitors and successfully prepare for tumultuous market forces.

In the legal market, knowledge is power.

This blog post was inspired by a session at CALL/ACBD 2018: Knowledge is Power: The Role of Law Librarians in the Future Legal Market presented by Jordan Furlong. 

Source
Furlong, J. (2018). Knowledge is Power: The Role of Law Librarians in the Future Legal Market. Plenary Session at CALL/ACBD 2018.

Gallop Portal

By Alan Kilpatrick

Did you know that the Gallop Portal (Government and Legislative Libraries Online Publications Portal) provides free and convenient access to almost 500,000 electronic government publications from all levels of Canadian government?

Launched five year ago by the Association of Parliamentary Libraries in Canada (APLIC), the portal is intended to provide Canadians with an easy way to access, connect, and interact with Canadian government resources.  Canadian Legislative and Parliamentary libraries are mandated to provide access to government documents by the Federal government’s Depository Services Program.

APLIC describes the portal as a “one-stop access point” to government publications.  Users can search for documents across jurisdiction and language using a variety of filtering options and a straightforward search interface.  The portal provides particularly high ease of use compared to other Canadian government websites.

We encourage you to check the Gallop Portal out at gallopportal.ca.

Towards Cannabis Legalization in Canada

Canada’s official cannabis legalization date is set for October 17th, 2018.  Legally, how did we get here?

In 2015, the Federal Government proposed legalizing cannabis.  Without a blueprint or roadmap to follow, the Government strove to explore the available evidence and balance a variety of health-related goals.  Behind their desire to consider legalization, the Government acknowledged that cannabis use is widespread, that criminalization has become a burden on the justice system, that organized crime benefits from criminalization, and that support for change is high among Canadians.

In December 2016, the Task Force on Cannabis Legalization issued its recommendation report, A Framework for the Legalization and Regulation of Cannabis in Canada.  After extensive consultations with domestic and international experts, Canadians, and interest groups, the Task Force brought forward almost 100 recommendations.  The report suggested a legislative framework for cannabis legalization in Canada.  Almost 30,000 submissions were made during the Task Force’s public consultations.

Five short months later in April 2017, the Government introduced Bill C-45, the Cannabis Act and Bill C-46, An Act to Amend the Criminal Code in the House of Commons.  Bill C-45 legalizes cannabis and advances several public health objectives.  They include protecting youth and controlling access.  More information about the Cannabis Act can be found here.

Bill C-46 amends the Criminal Code by creating new tools to identify drug impaired driving.  Identifying drug impaired driving is one of the larger challenges that has arisen due to legalization.  Several concerns still exist about the roadside screening procedures for cannabis use.

In the rapid leadup to legalization, each province has been required to draft its own cannabis legislation.  Legally, the Federal Government holds authority for cannabis production, licensing, tracking, and medicinal purposes.  Each Province is responsible for drafting a legislative framework to handle cannabis retail, distribution, public use, home cultivation, and minimum age limits.  You can learn more about the division of Federal and Provincial responsibilities here.

In the leadup to Saskatchewan’s own cannabis legislation, the Provincial Government conducted a province-wide survey in October 2017.  Notably, this survey received the highest response rate of any Saskatchewan Government survey ever.  Introduced in March 2018, Bill 121, The Cannabis Control (Saskatchewan) Act passed quickly through the Legislature and received royal assent in May 2018.

Saskatchewan’s bill aims to curtail criminal cannabis, protect youth, advance public health, and regulate legal use.  The legal age for cannabis use in the province has been set at 19.  Use in public spaces has been prohibited.  A zero-tolerance policy is in effect for driving.  Finally, the Province has established a private retail model for cannabis retailers that will be regulated by the Saskatchewan Liquor and Gaming Authority (SLGA).  Last month, the SLGA held a lottery to grant 51 cannabis retail permits to potential retailers.  SLGA has indicated that additional permits may be made available if demand warrants it.  You can read more about Saskatchewan’s Cannabis Framework here.

This post was inspired by a session at CALL/ACBD 2018: Cannabis Panel presented by Myrna Gillis, Matt Herder, Robert Strang, and Bob Purcell. 

Sources   

Gillis, M., Herder, M., Purcell, B., & Strang, R. (2018). Cannabis panel. Plenary Session at CALL/ACBD 2018.

Government of Canada (2018). Cannabis legalization and regulation.  Retrieved from http://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/cj-jp/cannabis/

Government of Canada. (2016). A Framework for the legalization and regulation of cannabis in Canada.  Retrieved from http://www.healthycanadians.gc.ca/task-force-marijuana-groupe-etude/framework-cadre/alt/framework-cadre-eng.pdf

Government of Canada. (2018). Introduction of the cannabis act: questions and answers.  Retrieved from https://www.canada.ca/en/services/health/campaigns/introduction-cannabis-act-questions-answers.html#a2

Government of Saskatchewan. (2018). Canada’s cannabis act. Retrieved from https://www.saskatchewan.ca/government/cannabis-in-saskatchewan/canadas-cannabis-act

Government of Saskatchewan. (2018). Saskatchewan’s cannabis framework: framework and survey results. Retrieved from http://publications.gov.sk.ca/documents/13/106026-SK-Cannabis-Framework.pdf

At the Leading Edge of Innovative Service: The Law Society of Saskatchewan Library

By Alan Kilpatrick

The Law Society of Saskatchewan Library supports the legal information needs of members, articling students, and the public by providing an online and print library collection, high quality legal research services, and a variety of Saskatchewan focused legal publications.  Our Library is committed to providing you with the legal resources you need to practice in the most convenient digital formats available.

Innovative Service
We provide two full-service libraries in the Regina Queen’s Bench Courthouse and the Saskatoon Queen’s Bench Courthouse.  Unstaffed rural libraries are in Prince Albert, Battleford, Yorkton, Lloydminster, Meadow Lake, Swift Current, Estevan, and Moose Jaw.

Members and articling students can access our comprehensive print legal collection through the Library catalogue: books, journals, loose leafs, statutes, case law reporters, and other legal reference materials.

Our Reference Librarians, Ken Fox and Alan Kilpatrick, provide high quality legal research services.  We are your legal information experts and can quickly and efficiently find whatever you are looking for.  Please contact us if you have questions about an online service we offer, require assistance locating a textbook, case, statute, or journal article, would like advice about legal research, or would like a point of law researched.  Do not hesitate to contact us for assistance.  We are here to help.

Online Members’ Section Resources
The Members’ Section of the Law Society website is our online law library.  It is your gateway to all the amazing online resources, databases, ebooks, and subscription products the Library has subscribed to.  These resources are available directly on your desktop wherever you are in the province.  Members and articling students have an individual login to the Members’ Section.  Please contact us at (306) 569-8020 or webmaster@lawsociety.sk.ca if you have trouble logging in.

Key resources in the Members’ Section include:
• Westlaw Next Canada
• O’Briens Internet
• HeinOnline
• Irwin Law e-library
• Emond Publications eBooks
• rangefindr

Contact Us
Please contact or visit the Library if you have any questions.

Copyright Act Review – An Update

By Alan Kilpatrick

Copyright matters.  The law surrounding copyright has a tremendous impact on learning, creativity, and the expression of ideas in Canadian society.

Libraries, like ours, have a particular interest in ongoing copyright law developments.  In addition to the landmark 2004 copyright decision that involved the Law Society of Upper Canada Library, CCH Canadian Ltd v Law Society of Upper Canada, 2004 SCC 13, copyright impacts everything libraries do.  It plays a defining role in what we can provide to members, how we interact with online resources, interlibrary loans, and so on.

The current copyright environment has been focused largely on the mandatory five-year parliamentary review of the Copyright Act that took place in May 2018.  Section 92 of the Act mandates this review, the first of which took place in 2012.  Taking place in several phases last month, the review consulted witnesses from specific sectors, Indigenous interest groups, and legal experts.  A cross-country public consultation was also conducted.  Ken Fox, our Saskatoon Reference Librarian, described many of the issues at play in the exciting leadup to the Act’s review in this blog post.  The review’s results are expected in 2019.

During the review, Canada’s library community advocated for fair and equitable use of copyright-protected materials.  The library sector placed particular emphasis on the importance of the fair dealing exception in Section 29 of the Act.  The Act includes several “exceptions” to copyright infringement that permit copying without permission for specific purposes and under certain conditions.  Exceptions are intended to balance the interests of those who own copyright-protected material and those who use copyright-protected materials.

We look forward to the results of the review process.  As a member of the library sector, we will continue to advocate for fair and equitable copyright.

You can learn more about copyright from these previous Legal Sourcery posts:

Copyright Law Basics (1) – Copyright is a Balancing Act
Copyright Law Basics (2) – Owner’s Rights
Copyright Law Basics (3) – User Rights and Fair Dealing

This post was inspired by a session at SLA 2018: Copyright and Libraries 2018 presented by Kate Langrell and Christina Winter. 

Source:
Langrell, K., & Winter, C. (2018). Copyright and Libraries 2018. Session at SLA 2018.

New Icons Improve HeinOnline’s Usability

By Alan Kilpatrick

HeinOnline is a popular online law library that provides over 2000 legal journals from Canada, the United States, and the Commonwealth as well as an impressive historical collection of case law and legislation from the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom.

Recently, HeinOnline launched a new series of “information icons.”  These icons make it easier to stay up-to-date with the details about a particular legal journal.  Located to the left of each title, the information icons will help you learn more about a journal and the last time it was updated:

Hovering over an icon with your cursor reveals that icon’s purpose.  It’s often challenging to identify information about specific journal titles in large electronic databases.  This is why HeinOnline’s new information icons are so helpful and appreciated.

Members can access HeinOnline through the Members’ Section of the Law Society website.

Source:
Zurawski, K. (2018, June 27). Ch-Ch-Ch-Changes: Introducing our New Icons in HeinOnline. Retrieved from https://home.heinonline.org/blog/2018/06/ch-ch-ch-changes-introducing-our-new-icons-in-heinonline/